J. L. BELL is a Massachusetts writer who specializes in (among other things) the start of the American Revolution in and around Boston. He is particularly interested in the experiences of children in 1765-75. He has published scholarly papers and popular articles for both children and adults. He was consultant for an episode of History Detectives, and contributed to a display at Minute Man National Historic Park.

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Sunday, February 02, 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz, Part 2

As explained yesterday, with the assistance of the University of Chicago Press, I’m ready to give away a copy of The Atlas of Boston History, edited by Nancy Seasholes.

Yesterday I posted six questions about the events of the year 1770. Here are seven more. Put your answers in comments to the postings. I’ll keep the comments hidden until the end of the day on Sunday, February 9. Whoever answers the most questions correctly by that time will win the atlas.

Working in groups is allowed. Consulting books is allowed. Googling is allowed. Wild guesses may not earn points but can be entertaining.

VII. What were the real names of people in Boston behind these nicknames or pseudonyms used in 1770?

A) Determinatus
B) The Irish Infant
C) Michael Johnson
D) Paoli
E) Philanthrop
F) Shan-ap-Morgan
G) Vindex
H) William the Knave

VIII. After approving the Short Narrative of the Horrid Massacre, Boston voted to send a copy to about two dozen potentially sympathetic readers in Britain. Who was the only woman on that list?

IX. What site on the Freedom Trail came under new management in 1770?

X. Match the following men to their experience of tarring and feathering in 1770.

1) John Adams
2) Robert Auchmuty
3) Henry Barnes
4) Theophilus Lillie
5) Patrick McMaster
6) William Molineux
7) Owen Richards
8) Jesse Savil

A) tarred and feathered by a mob in Gloucester
B) tarred and feathered by a mob led by a Connecticut captain
C) found his horse tarred and feathered
D) threatened in writing with tar and feathers while visiting Salem
E) found the outside of his shop tarred
F) carted around by a mob with tar and feathers but not tarred and feathered
G) filed suit against half a dozen people for tarring and feathering someone
H) defended a man accused of tarring and feathering someone

XI. One of the most famous men in the British Empire visited Massachusetts in August and September 1770 and never left. Who was he?

XII. Young servant Charles Bourgate accused his master Edward Manwaring, a Customs official, of shooting at the crowd during the Boston Massacre. At Manwaring’s trial in December, however, a jailhouse informant testified to hearing Bourgate say that Elizabeth Waldron had induced him to tell that lie. What did Waldron allegedly offer Bourgate for his testimony?

XIII. Three brothers from Massachusetts, two of them prominent in one of 1770’s most famous events, are said to have died at the same place, yet they were thousands of miles apart. Who were they, and how is this possible?

Good luck!

3 comments:

G. Lovely said...

Not ashamed to say I gave up and just bought the book. I look forward to seeing the answers.

Kathy said...

7. A. Determinatus, was Samuel Adams
B. The Irish Infant, was Mr. Forrest, a merchant
C. Michael Johnson, was an alias used by Crispus Attucks
D. Paoli, a toast used for ‘a great patriot’ William “Paoli” Molineaux
E. Philanthrop, was Jonathan Sewall
F. Shan-ap-Morgan was John Robinson
G. Vindex was used by Samuel Adams
H. William the Knave, was William Molineaux

8. The sympathetic woman to receive a ‘Short Narrative’ was Mrs. Catherine Macaulay.
9. Freedom Trail’s Paul Revere house was under new management when the Revere’s moved into this north end location from Clark’s Wharf.


10. match the tar and feather experience:
10.1. John Adams H) defended a man accused of tarring and feathering someone
10.2. Robert Auchmuty G) filed suit against half a dozen people for tarring and feathering someone
10.3. Henry Barnes C) found his horse tarred and feathered
10.4. Theopold Lillie E) found the outside of his shop tarred
10.5 Patrick McMaster F) carted around by a mob with tar and feathers but not tarred and feathered
10.6. Wm. Molineux D) threatened in writing with tar and feathers while visiting Salem
10.7 Owen Richards B) tarred and feathered by a mob led by a Connecticut captain
10.8 Jesse Savil A) tarred and feathered by a mob in Gloucester

11. The famous visitor who never left was Evangelist George Whitefield who spread the word of the Great Awakening on both sides of the Atlantic. He reached Boston in August, despite ill health continued preaching in New Hampshire locations, only to return to Massachusetts where he died in Newburyport, September,1770.

12. It was said that Elizabeth Waldron gave Bourgate gingerbread and cheese to entice him in swearing against his master.

13. The three were the Quincy brothers: Edmund, Samuel and Josiah II. Samuel and Josiah were involved in the Boston Massacre trials, and while both died at sea, Samuel’s ship was bound for Antigua, BW Indies, and Josiah thousands of miles away, died in site of Massachusetts.

“tricky”

John said...

VII A) Determinatus = Samuel Adams
B) The Irish Infant = James Forrest
C) Michael Johnson = Crispus Attucks
D) Paoli = William Molineux
E) Philanthrop = Jonathan Sewall
F) Shan-ap-Morgan = Samuel Adams
G) Vindex = Samuel Adams
H) William the Knave = William Molineux

VIII Mrs. Catherine Macaulay

IX The Paul Revere House. Paul Revere owned the house from 1770-1800.

X 1) John Adams H) defended a man accused of tarring and feathering someone
2) Robert Auchmuty G) filed suit against half a dozen people for tarring and feathering someone
3) Henry Barnes C) found his horse tarred and feathered
4) Theophilus Lillie E) found the outside of his shop tarred
5) Patrick McMaster F) carted around by a mob with tar and feathers but not tarred and feathered
6) William Molineux D) threatened in writing with tar and feathers while visiting Salem
7) Owen Richards B) tarred and feathered by a mob led by a Connecticut captain
8) Jesse Savil A) tarred and feathered by a mob in Gloucester

XI George Whitefield. He visited Massachusetts to preach, and died there on September 30, 1770.

XII Elizabeth Waldron allegedly offered Charles Bourgate gingerbread and cheese in exchange for him falsely testifying against his master Edward Manwaring.

XIII The three brothers from Massachusetts are Edmund Quincy (1733-1768), Samuel Quincy (1735-1789), and Josiah Quincy II (1744-1775). Two of the brothers, Samuel and Josiah, played prominent roles in the trial of Captain Preston and the soldiers who had been involved in the Boston Massacre in 1770. Josiah Quincy II and John Adams defended the soldiers, while Samuel Quincy and Robert Treat Paine were the prosecutors. All three brothers died at sea, although their deaths happened thousands of miles apart. Edmund died at sea in the West Indies. Josiah died at sea in sight of the land of Massachusetts. Samuel died at sea near Nimba, Liberia.