J. L. BELL is a Massachusetts writer who specializes in (among other things) the start of the American Revolution in and around Boston. He is particularly interested in the experiences of children in 1765-75. He has published scholarly papers and popular articles for both children and adults. He was consultant for an episode of History Detectives, and contributed to a display at Minute Man National Historic Park.

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Friday, October 06, 2017

Providence College’s Seminar on the History of Early America

The Department of History & Classics at Providence College in Rhode Island is launching a Seminar on the History of Early America.

Participants in these sessions “will discuss pre-circulated works in progress, including chapters of doctoral dissertations, book projects, and article drafts on any aspect of early American history.”

The material scheduled for the upcoming academic year is:

13 October
Susan Branson, Syracuse University
“Flights of Imagination: The Air Balloon as a Symbol of National Promise”

7 December
Lorri Glover, Saint Louis University
“‘An All Accomplished Woman’: Eliza Pinckney in the Age of Revolution”

1 March 2018
Julie Fisher, George Washington University & National Park Service
“What is Roger Williams?”

9 April
George Elliott, Brown University
Gershom Bulkeley and Alchemical Experimentation in Colonial New England”

3 May
Melissa Morris, Bridgewater State University
“Across the Channel, Across the Atlantic: Anglo-Dutch Collaboration in the Seventeenth Century Americas”

The seminar will meet in the Liberal Arts Seminar Room (room number 202) of the Ruane Center for the Humanities at Providence College in Providence, a couple of miles west of downtown. Each meeting will run from 4:30 to 6:00 P.M. For more information, contact Prof. Sharon Ann Murphy of Providence College.

(The photograph above shows a sack-back gown made for Eliza Pinckney around 1750 from silk harvested on her South Carolina plantation. It is now in the collection of the Smithsonian.)

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